The One Exercise You Should Be Doing To Improve Hip Mobility and Flexibility

Deep Squat
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Hip mobility and flexibility are incredibly important, especially as we age. Here’s one exercise you should be doing regularly to improve your hip mobility and flexibility

Over time, we’ve all heard about miraculous treatments and exercises for living a longer life. But could something as simple as a deep squat be the long-sought-after fountain of youth?

According to researchers who studied the Hadza tribe; maybe!

In this article, we’ll take a look at the potential link between longevity, health, and the deep squat!

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Sedentary Behavior Amongst the Hadza

Sedentary Behavior Amongst the Hadza

Across the world, most of the hunter-gatherers have died out, or have adopted modern lifestyles. However, there are a few tribes that still stick to an ancestral lifestyle.

One such tribe, the Hadza, are native to Tanzania. 

Intuitively, one would probably guess that a hunter-gatherer tribe would be significantly more active than a westerner from the current era. 

Interestingly, it seems that this group demonstrates almost an equal amount of sedentary behavior to those of us living modern lifestyles! But their sedentary activities consist of a more active form of sitting: the deep squat.

Deep Squats and Healthy Aging

Now, to be clear, the Hadza don’t have longer life expectancies than the rest of us.

However, by ditching chairs and opting for deep squats while resting, these people enjoy many health benefits. Some of these benefits even last late into life!

For instance, getting up from the floor easily can be a predictor of longevity and health later in life. Deep squatting stretches and strengthens many of the muscles that help us get up and down from the floor. 

How to Perfect the Deep Squat

While squats look easy, there are a number of important considerations pertaining to this exercise. 

If you don’t use good form when you squat, you could set yourself up for knee, hip, and back pain that will cause problems for many months or years. 

Follow the directions below to perform deep squats like a pro!

Step by Step Deep Squats

Deep Squat
  • Stand with your feet about hip-width apart.
  • Your feet can be pointed forward or slightly out to the sides.
  • Next, bend your knees as you lower your buttocks toward the ground.
  • If possible, try to keep your heels on the ground. This may be difficult for you at first, but keep working on it!
  • Once you lower down as far as you can, attempt to hold this bottom position for 30 seconds. Eventually, you’ll want to try to increase your time to minutes (or even hours, if you’re really committed!).
  • After you’ve got a good hold in the deep squat position, push yourself back up into standing.

Using the Deep Squat Throughout the Day

Once you get comfortable with deep squatting, you can start to incorporate it into your day.

There are many ways to do this. For instance, you may deep squat for portions of your work day. Alternatively, you might decide to hold a deep squat while you watch your favorite TV show. Once you truly master this move, you may even decide to deep squat while you eat dinner!

Truly, the deep squat can be used almost all day long. You can easily fit this move into your routine with just a few minor tweaks.

The Bottom Line 

There are many different claims out there about the best ways to improve longevity and health. However, many of them are misleading. When it comes down to it, you should aim to eat a healthy diet, minimize stress, and stay as active as possible. This will lead to a long, healthy life.

One of the best ways to stay active, even when you’re resting, is to utilize the deep squat. 

Try it out for yourself!

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Bennett Richardson, DPT, PT, CSCS

Bennett Richardson is a physical therapist and writer out of Pittsburgh, PA. He has maintained certification as a strength and conditioning coach (CSCS) since 2014. He then went on to earn a BS in exercise science and a doctorate degree in physical therapy, both from Slippery Rock University. In his free time, Bennett likes to read and exercise.

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