All It Takes Is 7 Moves and 15 Minutes To Build Muscle in Your Whole Body With No Weight

Best bodyweight workout moves
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When you are short on time and equipment at home, it’s so tempting to skip a workout and let it slide. But if you are looking to build and develop muscle all over and get in superb shape, consistency with workouts is key.

Luckily, you don’t need any equipment or whole a lot of time to get an effective muscle-building workout in.

All you need is a series of strengthening moves that hit every muscle in your body efficiently and effectively.

With this workout, precisely, all you need is 15 minutes and 5 moves.

It’ll hit all your major muscles in just 5 moves while keeping your intensity high for maximum fat and calorie burning and faster metabolism.

Complete 15-20 reps of each move or 45 seconds of each exercise.

Take about a minute break after you complete a set of all 5 moves.

Do 3 rounds in 15 minutes to burn fat, build strength, and develop muscle all over.

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7 Best Bodyweight Workout Moves

Mountain Climbers

Wall Walks

Wall Walks
Image // Menshealth.com

Have you ever wanted to do a handstand? Well, this exercise will help you get there. 

Wall walks incorporate tons of different muscles while forcing you to stabilize during a very tricky motion.

How to Perform:

  • Start in a pushup position, with your feet near a wall.
  • Slowly, walk your feet up the wall as you walk your hands backward.
  • Once you’ve gone as far back as you feel comfortable, begin walking your feet down the wall and your hands forward to the starting position.
  • Complete 10-12 reps per set, 3 sets per session, and 2-3 sessions per week.

Push-ups

Push-Ups: Bodyweight workouts

To build strength in your upper body, add pushups to your routine. This great move will target your biceps, triceps, abs, shoulders, and pectoral muscles. They will also strengthen your lower back and core.

Start in a plank with straight arms. Note: you can also perform on your knees.

Slowly lower your torso towards the ground without losing proper form, arms at a 90-degree angle, elbows in. On an exhale, return back to the starting position. That is 1 rep.

Want a more intense variation for that calorie burn? Try performing on an incline.

Squats

Squats

Strengthen your glutes, quads, and abs with the squat exercise.

This compound exercise is all about control. Take your time.

To perform the basic squat, stand upright with your feet shoulder-width apart, toes slightly turned out. Evenly distribute your weight between both feet and keep your weight in the heels and balls of each foot. Avoid any weight on your toes.

Extend your arms out in front of you, palms down. Your arms should be parallel to the floor.

With a neutral spine, engage your core as you slowly start to bend at the hips and knee joints, lowering your seat until your thighs are parallel with the ground. Your knees should not go past your toes.

On an exhale, press through your feet to return to the starting position. Continue for your desired number of reps.

Lat Pull Ups

Lat Pull Ups

Pull-ups are very difficult for most people. In fact, you’re unlikely to meet many people who can complete more than 10 quality pull-ups.

This is especially true for wide-grip or lat pull-ups. However, this exercise is well worth your time. It builds incredible strength all throughout the upper body.

How to Perform:

  • Grasp a sturdy bar with both palms facing forward. Your hands should be spaced out as far as you can spread them.
  • Slowly, pull your chest up toward the bar.
  • Once you’ve gotten your chin above the bar, slowly lower yourself down to the starting position.
  • Repeat for 8-10 reps per set, 3 sets per session, and 2-3 sessions per week.

Triceps Dips

Triceps Dips

This exercise will require the use of parallettes or sturdy bars on which you can place your full weight. 

Often parks will have parallel bars or pull-up bars which can help with this purpose. 

If not, however, you can purchase gymnastics rings which will enable you to perform dips anywhere that you can hand your straps.

How to Perform:

  • Place your hands on the parallel bars.
  • Push or jump yourself upward so that your arms are perfectly straight and your feet are off of the ground.
  • Slowly, lower yourself down by bending your elbows.
  • Once you’ve reached the bottom of your range, push yourself back up into the starting position.
  • Repeat for 10-15 reps per set, 3 sets per session, and 2-3 sessions per week.

Jack Lalanne Planks

Jack Lalanne Planks

Younger readers may be unfamiliar with Jack Lalanne. Jack Lalanne was a pioneer in the exercise world. This is especially true with it comes to bodyweight exercise.

Lalanne was famous for a certain type of pushup in which he placed his hands way out in front of him as he completed rep after rep. This plank variation is similar to Lalanne’s pushups.

How to Perform:

  • Start in the upward phase of a pushup.
  • Spread your hands and place them as far out in front of you as you can.
  • Next, spread your legs wide and kick them back as far as you can.
  • Hold this position for 30 seconds and repeat 4 times per session, 2-3 sessions per week.

Mountain Climbers

Mountain Climbers

Mountain climbers combine core and cardio work to make one devilishly tricky exercise. Be sure to have your towel ready while performing mountain climbers, as this move will certainly get you sweating!

How to Perform:

  • Start in a pushup position.
  • As fast as you can, bring your right knee to your chest, then return it to the starting position, swapping with your left knee.
  • Continue to alternate in this manner for 1 minute. Complete 3 sets per session and 2-3 sessions per week.

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Bennett Richardson, DPT, PT, CSCS
Bennett Richardson, DPT, PT, CSCS

Bennett Richardson is a physical therapist and writer out of Pittsburgh, PA. He has maintained certification as a strength and conditioning coach (CSCS) since 2014. He then went on to earn a BS in exercise science and a doctorate degree in physical therapy, both from Slippery Rock University. In his free time, Bennett likes to read and exercise.

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